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moneycontrol.com भारत | लेखांकन नीति > Diversified > लेखांकन नीति फॉलोड से महिंद्रा लॉजिस्टिक्स - बीएसई: 540768, NSE: MAHLOG

महिंद्रा लॉजिस्टिक्स

बीएसई: 540768  |  NSE: MAHLOG  |  ISIN: INE766P01016  |  Diversified

खोजें महिंद्रा लॉजिस्टिक्स कनेक्शन
लेखांकन नीति साल : मार्च '18

1.1. Statement of compliance

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance Indian Accounting Standard as per the Companies (Indian Accounting Standards) Rules, 2015 as amended and notified under Section 133 of the Companies Act, 2013 (the ‘Act’). The financial statements are separate financial statements.

1.2. Basis of preparation and presentation

The financial statements have been prepared on accrual basis and the historical cost basis as a going concern except for certain financial instruments that are measured at fair values or at amortised cost, wherever applicable, at the end of each reporting period, as explained in the accounting policies below.

Historical cost is generally based on the fair value of the consideration given in exchange for goods and services.

Fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date, regardless of whether that price is directly observable or estimated using another valuation technique. In estimating the fair value of an asset or a liability, the Company takes into account the characteristics of the asset or liability if market participants would take those characteristics into account when pricing the asset or liability at the measurement date. Fair value for measurement and/or disclosure purposes in this financial statement is determined on such basis, except for share-based payment transactions that are within the scope of Ind AS 102, leasing transactions that are within th e scope of Ind AS 17, and measurements that have some similarities to fair value but are not fair value, such as net realisable value in Ind AS 2 or value in use in Ind AS 36.

In addition, for financial reporting purposes, fair value measurements are categorised into Level 1, 2, or 3 based on the degree to which the inputs to the fair value measurements are observable and the significance of the inputs to the fair value measurement in its entirety, which are described as follows:

- Level 1 inputs are quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at the measurement date;

- Level 2 inputs are inputs, other than quoted prices included within Level 1, that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly; and

- Level 3 inputs are unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

The financial statements are prepared in Indian Rupee(INR) and denominated in crores.

The principal accounting policies are set out below.

1.3. Non-current assets held for sale

Non-current assets are classified as held for sale if their carrying amount will be recovered principally through a sale transaction rather than through continuing use. This condition is regarded as met only when the asset is available for immediate sale in its present condition subject only to terms that are usual and customary for sales of such asset and its sale is highly probable. Management must be committed to the sale, which should be expected to qualify for recognition as a completed sale within one year from the date of classification. Non-current assets classified as held for sale are measured at the lower of their carrying amount and fair value less costs to sell.

1.4. Revenue recognition

Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable.

1.4.1. Rendering of services

Incomes from logistics services rendered are recognised on the completion of the services as per the terms of contract. Revenue is recognized at the fair value of consideration received or receivable, to the extent that it is probable that the economic benefits will flow to the Company and the revenue can be reliably measured.

1.4.2. Dividend and interest income

Dividend income from investments is recognised when the right to receive payment has been established (provided that it is probable that the economic benefits will flow to the Company and the amount of income can be measured reliably).

Interest income from a financial asset is recognised when it is probable that the economic benefits will flow to the Company and the amount of income can be measured reliably. Interest income is accrued on a time basis, by reference to the principal outstanding and at the effective interest rate applicable, which is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset to that asset’s net carrying amount on initial recognition.

1.4.3. Sale of Goods

Sale of products are recognised when the products are dispatched which coincides with the transfer of risk and rewards to the buyer of products. Sales are exclusive of sales tax/ Goods and Service Tax & sales returns.

1.5. Leasing

Leases are classified as finance leases whenever the terms of the lease transfer substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership to the lessee. All other leases are classified as operating leases.

Certain arrangements convey a right to use an asset in return for a payment or series of payments. At inception of the arrangement, the Company determines whether such an arrangement is or contains a lease and seperates the consideration into those for the lease and those for the other elements. The lease component is accounted as per Company’s accounting policies on leasing transactions.

The Company’s significant operating leasing arrangements are in respect of office premises, warehouse, warehouse equipments and IT related equipments. Lease rentals are recognised as per the terms of lease.

Rental expense from operating leases is generally recognised on a straight-line basis over the term of the relevant lease. Where the rentals are structured solely to increase in line with expected general inflation to compensate for the lessor’s expected inflationary cost increases, such increases are recognised in the year in which such benefits accrue.

1.6. Foreign currencies

i. Initial recognition

In preparing the financial statements of the Company, transactions in currencies other than the entity’s functional currency of Indian Rupees (foreign currencies) are recognised at the rates of exchange prevailing at the dates of the transactions.

ii. Conversion

a. Foreign currency monetary assets and liabilities at the year-end are translated at the year-end exchange rates and the resultant exchange differences are recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

b. Non-monetary items, if any are measured in terms of historical cost denominated in a foreign currency, are reported using the exchange rate at the date of the transaction. Non-monetary items, which are measured at fair value or other similar valuation denominated in a foreign currency, are translated using the exchange rate at the date when such value was determined.

iii. Exchange differences

The Company accounts for exchange differences arising on translation/settlement of foreign currency monetary items as below:

a. Realized gains and losses on settlement of foreign currency transactions are recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

b. Foreign currency monetary assets and liabilities at the year-end are translated at the year-end exchange rates and the resultant exchange differences are recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

1.7. Borrowing costs

Borrowing Cost that are attributable to the acquisition or construction of qualifying assets are capitalised as part of the cost of such assets. A qualifying asset is one that necessarily takes a substantial period of time to get ready for its intended use or sale. All other borrowing costs are charged to revenue in the year of incurrence.

1.8. Employee benefits

1.8.1. Retirement benefit costs and termination benefits

i. Defined Contribution Plan:

Company’s contributions paid/payable during the year to the Superannuation Fund, ESIC, Provident Fund and Labour Welfare Fund are recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

ii. Defined Benefits Plan:

For defined retirement benefit plans, the cost of providing benefits is determined using the projected unit credit method, with actuarial valuations being carried out at the end of each annual reporting period. Remeasurement, comprising actuarial gains and losses, the effect of the changes to the asset ceiling (if applicable) and the return on plan assets (excluding net interest), is reflected immediately in the balance sheet with a charge or credit recognised in other comprehensive income in the period in which they occur. Remeasurement recognised in other comprehensive income is reflected immediately in retained earnings and is not reclassified to profit or loss. Past service cost is recognised in profit or loss in the period of a plan amendment. Net interest is calculated by applying the discount rate at the beginning of the period to the net defined benefit liability or asset. Defined benefit costs are categorised as follows:

a. service cost (including current service cost, past service cost, as well as gains and losses on curtailments and settlements);

b. net interest expense or income; and

c. remeasurement

The Company presents the first two components of defined benefit costs in profit or loss in the line item ‘Employee benefits expense’. Curtailment gains and losses are accounted for as past service costs.

The retirement benefit obligation recognised in the balance sheet represents the actual deficit or surplus in the Company’s defined benefit plans. Any surplus resulting from this calculation is limited to the present value of any economic benefits available in the form of refunds from the plans or reductions in future contributions to the plans.

1.8.2. Short-term and other long-term employee benefits

A liability is recognised for benefits accruing to employees in respect of wages and salaries.

Liabilities recognised in respect of short-term employee benefits are measured at the undiscounted amount of the benefits expected to be paid in exchange for the related service.

Liabilities recognised in respect of other long-term employee benefits are measured at the present value of the estimated future cash outflows expected to be made by the Company in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date.

1.9. Share-based payment arrangements

Equity-settled share-based payments to employees are measured at the fair value of the equity instruments at the grant date. Details regarding the determination of the fair value of equity-settled share-based transactions are set out in note no. 23.

The fair value determined at the grant date of the equity-settled share-based payments is expensed on a straight-line basis over the vesting period, based on the Company’s estimate of equity instruments that will eventually vest, with a corresponding increase in equity. At the end of each reporting period, the Company revises its estimate of the number of equity instruments expected to vest. The impact of the revision of the original estimates, if any, is recognised in profit or loss such that the cumulative expense reflects the revised estimate, with a corresponding adjustment to the equity-settled employee benefits reserve.

1.10. Taxation

Income tax expense represents the sum of the tax currently payable and deferred tax.

1.10.1. Current tax

The tax currently payable is based on taxable profit for the year. Taxable profit differs from ‘profit before tax’ as reported in the statement of profit and loss because of items of income or expense that are taxable or deductible in other years and items that are never taxable or deductible. The Company’s current tax is calculated using tax rates that have been enacted or substantively enacted by the end of the reporting period.

1.10.2. Deferred tax

Deferred tax is recognised on temporary differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities in the financial statements and the corresponding tax bases used in the computation of taxable profit. Deferred tax liabilities are generally recognised for all taxable temporary differences. Deferred tax assets are generally recognised for all deductible temporary differences to the extent that it is probable that taxable profits will be available against which those deductible temporary differences can be utilised. Such deferred tax assets and liabilities are not recognised if the temporary difference arises from the initial recognition (other than in a business combination) of assets and liabilities in a transaction that affects neither the taxable profit nor the accounting profit. In addition, deferred tax liabilities are not recognised if the temporary difference arises from the initial recognition of goodwill.

Deferred tax liabilities are recognised for taxable temporary differences associated with investments in subsidiaries and associates, and interests in joint ventures, except where the Company is able to control the reversal of the temporary difference and it is probable that the temporary difference will not reverse in the foreseeable future. Deferred tax assets arising from deductible temporary differences associated with such investments and interests are only recognised to the extent that it is probable that there will be sufficient taxable profits against which to utilise the benefits of the temporary differences and they are expected to reverse in the foreseeable future.

The carrying amount of deferred tax assets is reviewed at the end of each reporting period and reduced to the extent that it is no longer probable that sufficient taxable profits will be available to allow all or part of the asset to be recovered.

Deferred tax liabilities and assets are measured at the tax rates that are expected to apply in the period in which the liability is settled or the asset realised, based on tax rates (and tax laws) that have been enacted or substantively enacted by the end of the reporting period. The measurement of deferred tax liabilities and assets reflects the tax consequences that would follow from the manner in which the Company expects, at the end of the reporting period, to recover or settle the carrying amount of its assets and liabilities.

1.10.3. Current and deferred tax for the year

Current and deferred tax are recognised in profit or loss, except when they relate to items that are recognised in other comprehensive income or directly in equity, in which case, the current and deferred tax are also recognised in other comprehensive income or directly in equity respectively.

1.11. Property, plant and equipment

All items of property, plant and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses, if any. Cost of acquisition is inclusive of purchase price, levies and any directly attributable cost of bringing the assets to its working condition for the intended use. Subsequent costs are included in the assets carrying amount or recognised as separate asset, as appropriate, only when it is probable that the future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to the Company and cost of the item can be measured reliably. The carrying amount of any component accounted for as a separate asset is derecognised when replaced. All other repairs and maintenance are charged to Statement of profit and loss during the reporting period in which they are incurred.

Depreciation on tangible assets is charged by the Straight Line Method (SLM) in accordance with the useful lives specified in Part - C of Schedule II of the Companies Act, 2013 on a pro-rata basis except in the case of:

i. Certain items of Plant & Machinery individually costing more than Rs.5,000 - over their useful lives ranging from 2 years to 10 years as estimated by the Company and also based on the contractual arrangements wherever applicable.

ii. Certain items of Plant & Machinery individually costing less than Rs.5,000 shall be depreciated over a period of 1 year.

iii. Mobile Phones (included in Office equipment) in 2 years.

iv. Motor Cars (included in vehicles) in 5 years.

v. Assets capitalised which are attached to the leasehold office premises shall be depreciated upto 75% of its value over the lease period assuming a realisable value of 25% after the end of original lease period.

The estimated useful lives, residual values and depreciation method are reviewed at the end of each reporting period, with the effect of any changes in estimate accounted for on a prospective basis.

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no future economic benefits are expected to arise from the continued use of the asset. Any gain or loss arising on the disposal or retirement of an item of property, plant and equipment is determined as the difference between the sales proceeds and the carrying amount of the asset and is recognised in profit or loss.

1.12. Intangible assets

1.12.1. Intangible assets acquired separately

The useful lives of intangible assets are assessed as either finite or infinite. Intangible assets with finite useful lives that are acquired separately are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses. Amortisation is recognised on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives. The estimated useful life and amortisation method are reviewed at the end of each reporting period, with the effect of any changes in estimate being accounted for on a prospective basis.

Intangible assets with indefinite useful lives that are acquired separately are carried at cost less accumulated impairment losses.

1.12.2. Useful lives of intangible assets

The expenditure incurred is amortised over three financial years equally commencing from the year in which the expenditure is incurred.

1.13. Impairment of tangible and intangible assets

The management of the Company assesses at each balance sheet date whether there is any indication that an asset may be impaired. If any such indication exists, the management estimates the recoverable amount of the asset. If such recoverable amount of the asset is less than its carrying amount, the carrying amount is reduced to its recoverable amount. The reduction is treated as an impairment loss and recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss. If at the balance sheet date there is an indication that if a previously assessed impairment loss no longer exists, the recoverable amount is reassessed and the asset is reflected at the recoverable amount subject to a maximum of depreciated historical cost. A reversal of an impairment loss is recognised immediately in profit or loss.

1.14. Provisions, Contingent liabilities & Contingent assets

Provisions are recognised when the Company has a present obligation (legal or constructive) as a result of a past event, it is probable that the Company will be required to settle the obligation, and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation.

When some or all of the economic benefits required to settle a provision are expected to be recovered from a third party, a receivable is recognised as an asset if it is virtually certain that reimbursement will be received and the amount of the receivable can be measured reliably.

1.14.1. Onerous contracts

Present obligations arising under onerous contracts are recognised and measured as provisions. An onerous contract is considered to exist where the Company has a contract under which the unavoidable costs of meeting the obligations under the contract exceed the economic benefits expected to be received from the contract.

The amount recognised as a provision is the best estimate of the consideration required to settle the present obligation at the end of the reporting period, taking into account the risks and uncertainties surrounding the obligation. When a provision is measured using the cash flows estimated to settle the present obligation, its carrying amount is the present value of those cash flows (when the effect of the time value of money is material).

Contingent liabilities are disclosed when there is a possible obligation arising from past events, the existence of which will be confirmed only by the occurrence or non-occurrence of one or more uncertain future events not wholly within the control of the Company or a present obligation that arises from past events where it is either not probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation or a reliable estimate of the amount cannot be made.

A contingent asset is disclosed where an inflow of economic benefits is probable.

1.15. Financial instruments

Financial assets and financial liabilities are recognised when a Company becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instruments. Financial assets and financial liabilities are initially measured at fair value. Transaction costs that are directly attributable to the acquisition or issue of financial assets and financial liabilities (other than financial assets and financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss) are added to or deducted from the fair value of the financial assets or financial liabilities, as appropriate, on initial recognition. Transaction costs directly attributable to the acquisition of financial assets or financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are recognised immediately in profit or loss.

1.16. Financial assets

All regular way purchases or sales of financial assets are recognised and derecognised on a settlement date basis. Regular way purchases or sales are purchases or sales of financial assets that require delivery of assets within the time frame established by regulation or convention in the marketplace.

All recognised financial assets are subsequently measured in their entirety at either amortised cost or fair value, depending on the classification of the financial assets.

1.16.1. Classification of financial assets

Debt instruments that meet the following conditions are subsequently measured at amortised cost (except for debt instruments that are designated as at fair value through profit or loss on initial recognition):

(i) the asset is held within a business model whose objective is to hold assets in order to collect contractual cash flows; and

(ii) the contractual terms of the instrument give rise on specified dates to cash flows that are solely payments of principal and interest on the principal amount outstanding.

For the impairment policy on financial assets measured at amortised cost, refer Note 2.16.4 Investments in subsidiaries: All investments in subsidiaries are valued at cost.

All other financial assets are subsequently measured at fair value.

1.16.2. Effective interest method

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a debt instrument and of allocating interest income over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts (including all fees and points paid or received that form an integral part of the effective interest rate, transaction costs and other premiums or discounts) through the expected life of the debt instrument, or, where appropriate, a shorter period, to the net carrying amount on initial recognition.

Income is recognised on an effective interest basis for debt instruments other than those financial assets classified as at FVTPL. Interest income is recognised in profit or loss and is included in the “Other income” line item.

1.16.3. Financial assets at Fair value through Profit and Loss

Investments in equity instruments are classified as at FVTPL, unless the Company irrevocably elects on initial recognition to present subsequent changes in fair value in other comprehensive income for investments in equity instruments which are not held for trading.

A financial asset that meets the amortised cost criteria or debt instruments that meet the FVTOCI criteria may be designated as at FVTPL upon initial recognition if such designation eliminates or significantly reduces a measurement or recognition inconsistency that would arise from measuring assets or liabilities or recognising the gains and losses on them on different bases.

Financial assets at FVTPL are measured at fair value at the end of each reporting period, with any gains or losses arising on remeasurement recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any dividend or interest earned on the financial asset and is included in the ‘Other income’ line item. Dividend on financial assets at FVTPL is recognised when the Company’s right to receive the dividends is established, it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the dividend will flow to the entity and the amount of dividend can be measured reliably.

1.16.4. Impairment of financial assets

The Company applies the expected credit loss model for recognising impairment loss on financial assets measured at amortised cost, trade receivables, other contractual rights to receive cash or other financial asset, and financial guarantees not designated as at FVTPL.

Expected credit losses are the weighted average of credit losses with the respective risks of default occurring as the weights. Credit loss is the difference between all contractual cash flows that are due to the Company in accordance with the contract and all the cash flows that the Company expects to receive (i.e. all cash shortfalls), discounted at the original effective interest rate (or credit-adjusted effective interest rate for purchased or originated credit-impaired financial assets).

The Company measures the loss allowance for a financial instrument at an amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses if the credit risk on that financial instrument has increased significantly since initial recognition.

When making the assessment of whether there has been a significant increase in credit risk since initial recognition, the Company uses the change in the risk of a default occurring over the expected life of the financial instrument instead of the change in the amount of expected credit losses. To make that assessment, the Company compares the risk of a default occurring on the financial instrument as at the reporting date with the risk of a default occurring on the financial instrument as at the date of initial recognition and considers reasonable and supportable information, that is available without undue cost or effort, that is indicative of significant increases in credit risk since initial recognition.

For trade receivables or any contractual right to receive cash or another financial asset that result from transactions that are within the scope of Ind AS 18, the Company always measures the loss allowance at an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses.

Further, for the purpose of measuring lifetime expected credit loss allowance for trade receivables, the Company has used a practical expedient as permitted under Ind AS 109. This expected credit loss allowance is computed based on a provision matrix which takes into account historical credit loss experience and adjusted for forward-looking information.

1.16.5. Derecognition of financial assets

The Company derecognises a financial asset when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the asset expire, or when it transfers the financial asset and substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of the asset to another party. If the Company neither transfers nor retains substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership and continues to control the transferred asset, the Company recognises its retained interest in the asset and an associated liability for amounts it may have to pay. If the Company retains substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of a transferred financial asset, the Company continues to recognise the financial asset and also recognises a collateralised borrowing for the proceeds received.

On derecognition of a financial asset in its entirety, the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the sum of the consideration received and receivable and the cumulative gain or loss that had been recognised in other comprehensive income and accumulated in equity is recognised in profit or loss if such gain or loss would have otherwise been recognised in profit or loss on disposal of that financial asset.

On derecognition of a financial asset other than in its entirety (e.g. when the Company retains an option to repurchase part of a transferred asset), the Company allocates the previous carrying amount of the financial asset between the part it continues to recognise under continuing involvement, and the part it no longer recognises on the basis of the relative fair values of those parts on the date of the transfer. The difference between the carrying amount allocated to the part that is no longer recognised and the sum of the consideration received for the part no longer recognised and any cumulative gain or loss allocated to it that had been recognised in other comprehensive income is recognised in profit or loss if such gain or loss would have otherwise been recognised in profit or loss on disposal of that financial asset. A cumulative gain or loss that had been recognised in other comprehensive income is allocated between the part that continues to be recognised and the part that is no longer recognised on the basis of the relative fair values of those parts.

1.16.6. Foreign exchange gains and losses

The fair value of financial assets denominated in a foreign currency is determined in that foreign currency and translated at the spot rate at the end of each reporting period.

- For foreign currency denominated financial assets measured at amortised cost and FVTPL, the exchange differences are recognised in profit or loss except for those which are designated as hedging instruments in a hedging relationship.

- Changes in the carrying amount of investments in equity instruments at FVTOCI relating to changes in foreign currency rates are recognised in other comprehensive income.

- For the purposes of recognising foreign exchange gains and losses, FVTOCI debt instruments are treated as financial assets measured at amortised cost. Thus, the exchange differences on the amortised cost are recognised in profit or loss and other changes in the fair value of FVTOCI financial assets are recognised in other comprehensive income.

1.17. Financial liabilities and equity instruments

1.17.1. Classification as debt or equity

Debt and equity instruments issued by a Company are classified as either financial liabilities or as equity in accordance with the substance of the contractual arrangements and the definitions of a financial liability and an equity instrument.

1.17.2. Equity instruments

An equity instrument is any contract that evidences a residual interest in the assets of an entity after deducting all of its liabilities. Equity instruments issued by a Company entity are recognised at the proceeds received, net of direct issue costs.

Repurchase of the Company’s own equity instruments is recognised and deducted directly in equity. No gain or loss is recognised in profit or loss on the purchase, sale, issue or cancellation of the Company’s own equity instruments.

1.17.3. Compound financial instruments

The component parts of compound financial instruments (convertible notes) issued by the Company are classified separately as financial liabilities and equity in accordance with the substance of the contractual arrangements and the definitions of a financial liability and an equity instrument. A conversion option that will be settled by the exchange of a fixed amount of cash or another financial asset for a fixed number of the Company’s own equity instruments is an equity instrument.

At the date of issue, the fair value of the liability component is estimated using the prevailing market interest rate for similar non-convertible instruments. This amount is recognised as a liability on an amortised cost basis using the effective interest method until extinguished upon conversion or at the instrument’s maturity date.

The conversion option classified as equity is determined by deducting the amount of the liability component from the fair value of the compound financial instrument as a whole. This is recognised and included in equity, net of income tax effects, and is not subsequently remeasured. In addition, the conversion option classified as equity will remain in equity until the conversion option is exercised, in which case, the balance recognised in equity will be transferred to other component of equity. When the conversion option remains unexercised at the maturity date of the convertible note, the balance recognised in equity will be transferred to retained earnings. No gain or loss is recognised in profit or loss upon conversion or expiration of the conversion option.

1.17.4. Financial liabilities

All financial liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost.

Financial liabilities that are not held-for-trading and are not designated as at FVTPL are measured at amortised cost at the end of subsequent accounting periods. The carrying amounts of financial liabilities that are subsequently measured at amortised cost are determined based on the effective interest method. Interest expense that is not capitalised as part of costs of an asset is included in the ‘Finance costs’ line item.

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial liability and of allocating interest expense over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash payments (including all fees that form an integral part of the effective interest rate, transaction costs and other premiums or discounts) through the expected life of the financial liability, or (where appropriate) a shorter period, to the net carrying amount on initial recognition.

1.18. Segment Accounting

The CEO monitors the operating results of the business segments separately for the purpose of making decisions about the allocation of resources and performance assessment. Segment performance is measured based on profit or loss and is measured consistently with profit or loss in financial statements.

1.18.1. Identification of Operating Segments

The operating segments have been identified based on its services and has two reportable segments, as follows:

i. Supply Chain Management - Goods Transportation service including warehouse management service.

ii. People Logistics - People Transportation Service.

1.18.2. Accounting of Operating Segments

Accounting policies adopted for segment reporting are in line with the accounting policies of the Company. Revenue and expenses have been identified to segments on the basis of their relationship to the operating activities of the segment. Revenues and expenses, which relate to the enterprise as a whole and are not allocable to segments on a reasonable basis and inter-segment revenue and expenses, have been included under “Unallocated Corporate Expenses/Eliminations”.

1.19. Earnings Per Share

Basic and diluted earnings per share is computed by dividing the net profit or loss for the year attributable to equity shareholders by the weighted average number of Equity Shares outstanding during the year, in accordance with Ind AS 33.

स्रोत: रेलीगरे टेचनोवा

न्यूज़ फ़्लैश

  • MARKET CUES : FIIs ने कैश में `436 Cr की खरीदारी की
  • MARKET CUES : DIIs ने कैश में `929 Cr की खरीदारी की
  • MARKET CUES : FIIs ने F&O में `1244 Cr की खरीदारी की
  • MARKET CUES : इंडेक्स फ्यूचर्स में `744 Cr की खरीदारी की
  • MARKET CUES : इंडेक्स ऑप्शंस में `137 Cr की खरीदारी की
  • MARKET CUES : स्टॉक फ्यूचर्स में `358 Cr की खरीदारी की
  • MS ON WIPRO : Underweight रेटिंग, लक्ष्य घटाकर `230/Sh
  • JEFFERIES ON WIPRO : Underperform रेटिंग, लक्ष्य घटाकर `218/Sh
  • CITI ON ACC : BUY रेटिंग, लक्ष्य घटाकर `2150/Sh
  • CLSA ON ACC : BUY रेटिंग, लक्ष्य `2050/Sh

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