मैट्रिक्स
 
 
moneycontrol.com भारत | लेखांकन नीति > Media & Entertainment > लेखांकन नीति फॉलोड से एनडीटीवी - बीएसई: 532529, NSE: NDTV

एनडीटीवी

बीएसई: 532529  |  NSE: NDTV  |  ISIN: INE155G01029  |  Media & Entertainment

खोजें एनडीटीवी कनेक्शन मार्च 16
लेखांकन नीति साल : मार्च '18

1 Significant accounting policies

a. Foreign currency

Foreign currency transactions

Transactions in foreign currencies are translated into the functional currency of company at the exchange rates at the dates of the transactions or an average rate if the average rate approximates the actual rate at the date of the transaction.

Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are translated into the functional currency at the exchange rate at the reporting date. Non-monetary assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value in a foreign currency are translated into the functional currency at the exchange rate when the fair value was determined. Non-monetary assets and liabilities that are measured based on historical cost in a foreign currency are translated at the exchange rate at the date of the transaction. Exchange differences are recognised in profit or loss.

b. Financial instruments

Financial instrument is any contract that gives rise to a financial asset of the entity and a financial liability or equity instrument of another entity.

i. Recognition and initial measurement

Trade receivables and debt securities issued are initially recognised when they are originated. All other financial assets and financial liabilities are initially recognised when the company becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instrument.

A financial asset or financial liability is initially measured at fair value plus, for an item not at fair value through profit and loss (FVTPL), transaction costs that are directly attributable to its acquisition or issue.

ii. Classification and subsequent measurement Financial assets

On initial recognition, a financial asset is classified as measured at:

- amortised cost;

- fair value through other comprehensive income (FVOCI) - debt investment;

- FVOCI - equity investment; or

- FVTPL

Financial assets are not reclassified subsequent to their initial recognition, except if and in the period the Company changes its business model for managing financial assets.

A financial asset is measured at amortised cost if it meets both of the following conditions and is not designated as at FVTPL:

- the asset is held within a business model whose objective is to hold assets to collect contractual cash flows; and

- the contractual terms of the financial asset give rise on specified dates to cash flows that are solely payments of principal and interest on the principal amount outstanding.”

A debt investment is measured at FVOCI if it meets both of the following conditions and is not designated as at FVTPL:

- the asset is held within a business model whose objective is achieved by both collecting contractual cash flows and selling financial assets; and

- the contractual terms of the financial asset give rise on specified dates to cash flows that are solely payments of principal and interest on the principal amount outstanding.

On initial recognition of an equity investment that is not held for trading, the company may irrevocably elect to present subsequent changes in the investment’s fair value in OCI (designated as FVOCI - equity investment). This election is made on an investment-by-investment basis.

All financial assets not classified as measured at amortised cost or FVOCI as described above are measured at FVTPL. On initial recognition, the company may irrevocably designate a financial asset that otherwise meets the requirements to be measured at amortised cost or at FVOCI as at FVTPL if doing so eliminates or significantly reduces an accounting mismatch that would otherwise arise.

Financial assets: Subsequent measurement and gains and losses

Financial liabilities: Classification, subsequent measurement and gains and losses

Financial liabilities are classified as measured at amortised cost or FVTPL. A financial liability is classified as at FVTPL if it is classified as held-for-trading, or it is a derivative or it is designated as such on initial recognition. Financial liabilities at FVTPL are measured at fair value and net gains and losses, including any interest expense, are recognised in profit or loss. Other financial liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method. Interest expense and foreign exchange gains and losses are recognised in profit or loss. Any gain or loss on derecognition is also recognised in profit or loss.

iii. Derecognition Financial assets

The Company derecognises a financial asset when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire, or it transfers the rights to receive the contractual cash flows in a transaction in which substantially all of the risks and rewards of ownership of the financial asset are transferred or in which the company neither transfers nor retains substantially all of the risks and rewards of ownership and does not retain control of the financial asset.

If the Company enters into transactions whereby it transfers assets recognised on its Balance Sheet, but retains either all or substantially all of the risks and rewards of the transferred assets, the transferred assets are not derecognised.

Financial liabilities

The Company derecognises a financial liability when its contractual obligations are discharged or cancelled, or expire.

The Company also derecognises a financial liability when its terms are modified and the cash flows under the modified terms are substantially different. In this case, a new financial liability based on the modified terms is recognised at fair value. The difference between the carrying amount of the financial liability extinguished and the new financial liability with modified terms is recognised in profit or loss.

iv. Offsetting

Financial assets and financial liabilities are offset and the net amount presented in the Balance Sheet when, and only when, the Company currently has a legally enforceable right to set off the amounts and it intends either to settle them on a net basis or to realise the asset and settle the liability simultaneously.

c. Property, plant and equipment

i. Recognition and measurement

Items of property, plant and equipment are measured at cost, which includes capitalised borrowing costs, less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses, if any. Cost of an item of property, plant and equipment comprises its purchase price, including import duties and non-refundable purchase taxes, after deducting trade discounts and rebates, any directly attributable cost of bringing the item to its working condition for its intended use and estimated costs of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located.

The cost of a self-constructed item of property, plant and equipment comprises the cost of materials and direct labor, any other costs directly attributable to bringing the item to working condition for its intended use, and estimated costs of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located.

If significant parts of an item of property, plant and equipment have different useful lives, then they are accounted for as separate items (major components) of property, plant and equipment.

Any gain or loss on disposal of an item of property, plant and equipment is recognised in profit or loss.

ii. Transition to Ind AS

On transition to Ind AS, the company has elected to continue with the carrying value of all of its property, plant and equipment recognised as at 1 April 2016, measured as per the previous GAAP, and use that carrying value as the deemed cost of such property, plant and equipment.

iii. Subsequent expenditure

Subsequent expenditure is capitalised only if it is probable that the future economic benefits associated with the expenditure will flow to the Company.

iv. Depreciation

Depreciation is calculated on cost of items of property, plant and equipment less their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives using the straight-line method, and is generally recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss. Assets acquired under finance leases are depreciated over the shorter of the lease term and their useful lives unless it is reasonably certain that the company will obtain ownership by the end of the lease term. Freehold land is not depreciated.

The useful lives as estimated for tangible assets are in accordance with the useful lives as indicated in Schedule II of the Companies Act, 2013 except for the following classes of assets where difference useful lives have been used:

Depreciation method, useful lives and residual values are reviewed at each financial year-end and adjusted if appropriate. Based on technical evaluation and consequent advice, the management believes that its estimates of useful lives as given above best represent the period over which management expects to use these assets.

Depreciation on additions (disposals) is provided on a pro-rata basis i.e. from (upto) the date on which asset is ready for use (disposed of).

d. Intangible assets

i. Recognition and measurement

Intangible assets including those acquired by the company in a business combination are initially measured at cost. Such intangible assets are subsequently measured at cost less accumulated amortisation and any accumulated impairment losses.

ii. Subsequent expenditure

Subsequent expenditure is capitalised only when it increases the future economic benefits embodied in the specific asset to which it relates. All other expenditure, including expenditure on is recognised in profit or loss as incurred.

iii. Transition to Ind AS

On transition to Ind AS, the Company has elected to continue with the carrying value of all of its intangible assets recognised as at 1 April 2016, measured as per the previous GAAP, and use that carrying value as the deemed cost of such intangible assets.

iv. Amortisation

Amortisation is calculated to write off the cost of intangible assets less their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives using the straight-line method, and is included in depreciation and amortisation in Statement of Profit and Loss.

Amortisation method, useful lives and residual values are reviewed at the end of each financial year and adjusted if appropriate.

e. Investment property

Investment property is property held either to earn rental income or for capital appreciation or for both, but not for sale in the ordinary course of business, use in the production or supply of goods or services or for administrative purposes. Upon initial recognition, an investment property is measured at cost. Subsequent to initial recognition, investment property is measured at cost less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses, if any.

On transition to Ind AS, the Company has elected to continue with the carrying value of all of its investment property recognised as at 1 April 2016, measured as per the previous GAAP and use that carrying value as the deemed cost of such investment property.

Based on technical evaluation and consequent advice, the management believes a period of 60 years as representing the best estimate of the period over which investment properties (which are quite similar) are expected to be used. Accordingly, the company depreciates investment properties over a period of 60 years on a straight-line basis.

Any gain or loss on disposal of an investment property is recognised in profit or loss.

The fair values of investment property is disclosed in the notes. Fair values is determined by an independent valuer who holds a recognised and relevant professional qualification and has recent experience in the location and category of the investment property being valued.

f. Inventories

Inventories are measured at the lower of cost and net realisable value. The cost of inventories is based on the first-in first-out formula, and includes expenditure incurred in acquiring the inventories, production or conversion costs and other costs incurred in bringing them to their present location and condition.

Net realisable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business, less the estimated costs of completion and selling expenses.

Stores and spares consist of blank video tapes (Beta Cam and DVC) and equipment spare parts and are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Cost is measured on a First In First Out (FIFO) basis.

Programmes under production and finished programmes

Inventories related to television software (programmes completed, in process of production, available for sale or purchased programmes) are stated at the lower of cost (which includes direct production costs, story costs, acquisition of footage and allocable production overheads) and net realisable value. The Company charges to the Statement of Profit and Loss, the costs incurred on non-news programmes produced by it based on the estimated revenues generated by the first and the subsequent telecasts.

g. Impairment

i. Impairment of financial instruments

The Company recognises loss allowances for expected credit losses on:

-financial assets measured at amortised cost; and -financial assets measured at FVOCI.

At each reporting date, the Company assesses whether financial assets carried at amortised cost are credit-impaired. A financial asset is ‘credit-impaired’ when one or more events that have a detrimental impact on the estimated future cash flows of the financial asset have occurred.

Evidence that a financial asset is credit-impaired includes the following observable data:

- significant financial difficulty of the borrower or issuer;

- a breach of contract such as a default or being past due for 90 days or more;

- the restructuring of a loan or advance by the company on terms that the company would not consider otherwise;

- it is probable that the borrower will enter bankruptcy or other financial reorganisation; or

- the disappearance of an active market for a security because of financial difficulties. The Company measures loss allowances at an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses, except for the following, which are measured as 12 month expected credit losses:

- debt securities that are determined to have low credit risk at the reporting date; and

- other debt securities and bank balances for which credit risk (i.e. the risk of default occurring over the expected life of the financial instrument) has not increased significantly since initial recognition.

Loss allowances for trade receivables are always measured at an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses.

Lifetime expected credit losses are the expected credit losses that result from all possible default events over the expected life of a financial instrument.

12-month expected credit losses are the portion of expected credit losses that result from default events that are possible within 12 months after the reporting date (or a shorter period if the expected life of the instrument is less than 12 months).

In all cases, the maximum period considered when estimating expected credit losses is the maximum contractual period over which the Company is exposed to credit risk.

When determining whether the credit risk of a financial asset has increased significantly since initial recognition and when estimating expected credit losses, the Company considers reasonable and supportable information that is relevant and available without undue cost or effort. This includes both quantitative and qualitative information and analysis, based on the Company’s historical experience and informed credit assessment and including forward-looking information.

Measurement of expected credit losses

Expected credit losses are a probability-weighted estimate of credit losses. Credit losses are measured as the present value of all cash shortfalls (i.e. the difference between the cash flows due to the Company in accordance with the contract and the cash flows that the Company expects to receive).

Presentation of allowance for expected credit losses in the Balance Sheet

Loss allowances for financial assets measured at amortised cost are deducted from the gross carrying amount of the assets.

Write-off

The gross carrying amount of a financial asset is written off (either partially or in full) to the extent that there is no realistic prospect of recovery. This is generally the case when the company determines that the debtor does not have assets or sources of income that could generate sufficient cash flows to repay the amounts subject to the write-off. However, financial assets that are written off could still be subject to enforcement activities in order to comply with the company’s procedures for recovery of amounts due.

ii. Impairment of non-financial assets

The Company’s non-financial assets, other than inventories and deferred tax assets, are reviewed at each reporting date to determine whether there is any indication of impairment.

If any such indication exists, then the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated.

For impairment testing, assets that do not generate independent cash inflows are grouped together into cash-generating units (CGUs). Each CGU represents the smallest group of assets that generates cash inflows that are largely independent of the cash inflows of other assets or CGUs.

The recoverable amount of a CGU (or an individual asset) is the higher of its value in use and its fair value less costs to sell. Value in use is based on the estimated future cash flows, discounted to their present value using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the CGU (or the asset).

The Company’s corporate assets (e.g., central office building for providing support to various CGUs) do not generate independent cash inflows. To determine impairment of a corporate asset, recoverable amount is determined for the CGUs to which the corporate asset belongs.

An impairment loss is recognised if the carrying amount of an asset or CGU exceeds its estimated recoverable amount. Impairment losses are recognised in the statement of profit and loss. Impairment loss recognised in respect of a CGU is allocated first to reduce the carrying amount of any goodwill allocated to the CGU, and then to reduce the carrying amounts of the other assets of the CGU (or company of CGUs) on a pro rata basis.

In respect of assets for which impairment loss has been recognised in prior periods, the company reviews at each reporting date whether there is any indication that the loss has decreased or no longer exists. An impairment loss is reversed if there has been a change in the estimates used to determine the recoverable amount. Such a reversal is made only to the extent that the asset’s carrying amount does not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined, net of depreciation or amortisation, if no impairment loss had been recognised.

h. Employee benefits

i. Short-term employee benefits

Short-term employee benefit obligations are measured on an undiscounted basis and are expensed as the related service is provided. A liability is recognised for the amount expected to be paid e.g., under short-term cash bonus, if the company has a present legal or constructive obligation to pay this amount as a result of past service provided by the employee, and the amount of obligation can be estimated reliably.

ii. Defined contribution plan

A defined contribution plan is a post-employment benefit plan under which an entity pays fixed contributions into a separate entity and will have no legal or constructive obligation to pay further amounts. The company makes specified monthly contributions towards Government administered provident fund scheme. Obligations for contributions to defined contribution plans are recognised as an employee benefit expense in profit or loss in the periods during which the related services are rendered by employees.

iii. Defined benefit plan

A defined benefit plan is a post-employment benefit plan other than a defined contribution plan. The company’s net obligation in respect of defined benefit plans is calculated separately for each plan by estimating the amount of future benefit that employees have earned in the current and prior periods, discounting that amount and deducting the fair value of any plan assets. In respect of gratuity, the Company funds the benefits through annual contributions to the Life Insurance Corporation of India (LIC). Under this scheme, LIC assumes the obligation to settle the gratuity payment to the employees to the extent of the funding including accumulated interest.

The calculation of defined benefit obligation is performed annually by a qualified actuary using the projected unit credit method. When the calculation results in a potential asset for the company, the recognised asset is limited to the present value of economic benefits available in the form of any future refunds from the plan or reductions in future contributions to the plan (‘the asset ceiling’).

Remeasurements of the net defined benefit liability, which comprise actuarial gains and losses, the return on plan assets (excluding interest) and the effect of the asset ceiling (if any, excluding interest), are recognised in OCI. The company determines the net interest expense (income) on the net defined benefit liability (asset) for the period by applying the discount rate used to measure the defined benefit obligation at the beginning of the annual period to the then-net defined benefit liability (asset), taking into account any changes in the net defined benefit liability (asset) during the period as a result of contributions and benefit payments. Net interest expense and other expenses related to defined benefit plans are recognised in profit or loss.

When the benefits of a plan are changed or when a plan is curtailed, the resulting change in benefit that relates to past service (‘past service cost’ or ‘past service gain’) or the gain or loss on curtailment is recognised immediately in profit or loss. The company recognises gains and losses on the settlement of a defined benefit plan when the settlement occurs.

iv. Termination benefits

Termination benefits are expensed at the earlier of when the company can no longer withdraw the offer of those benefits and when the Company recognises costs for a restructuring. If benefits are not expected to be settled wholly within 12 months of the reporting date, then they are discounted.

i. Provisions

A provision is recognised if, as a result of a past event, the company has a present legal or constructive obligation that can be estimated reliably, and it is probable that an outflow of economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation. Provisions are determined by discounting the expected future cash flows (representing the best estimate of the expenditure required to settle the present obligation at the Balance Sheet date) at a pre-tax rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the liability. The unwinding of the discount is recognised as finance cost. Expected future operating losses are not provided for.

j. Revenue

Revenue is measured at fair value of consideration received or receivable. Amounts disclosed as revenue are net of taxes, rebates, trade allowances and amount collected on behalf of others.

The Company recognises revenue when the amount of revenue can be reliably measured, it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to the entity and specific criteria have been met for each of the company’s activities as described below. The Company bases its estimates on historical results, taking into consideration the type of customer, the type of transaction and the specifics of each arrangement.”

i. Advertisement revenue

Advertisement revenue from broadcasting is recognised when advertisements are displayed. The revenue with regards to the contracts where drop slots/ bonus slots etc. offered to its customers is deferred.

ii. Revenue from events and shared services

Revenue from events and shared services are recognised as the services are provided.

iii. Subscription revenue

Subscription revenue from direct-to-home satellite operators and other distributors for the right to distribute the channels is recognised when the service has been provided as per the terms of the contract.

iv. Revenues from production arrangements

Revenues from production arrangements are recognised when the contract period begins and the programming is available for telecast pursuant to the terms of the agreement. Typically the milestone is reached when the finished product has been delivered or made available to and accepted by the customer. k. Barter transactions

Barter transactions are recognised at the fair value of the consideration received or rendered. When the fair value of the transactions cannot be measured reliably, the revenue / expense is measured at the fair value of the goods / services provided or received, adjusted by the amount of cash or cash equivalent transferred.

In the normal course of business, the Company enters into a transaction in which it purchases an asset or a service for business purposes and/or makes an investment in a customer and at the same time negotiates a contract for sale of advertising to the seller of the asset or service, as the case may be. Arrangements though negotiated contemporaneously, may be documented in one or more contracts. The Company’s policy for accounting for each transaction negotiated simultaneously is to record each element of the transaction based on the respective estimated fair values of the assets or services purchased or investments made and the airtime sold. Assets which are acquired in the form of investments are recorded as investments and accounted for accordingly. In determining their fair value, the Company refers to independent appraisals (where available), historical transactions or comparable cash transactions. l. Lease

i) Determining whether an arrangement contains a lease

At inception of an arrangement, it is determined whether the arrangement is or contains a lease.

At inception or on reassessment of the arrangement that contains a lease, the payments and other consideration required by such an arrangement are separated into those for the lease and those for other elements on the basis of their relative fair values. If it is concluded for a finance lease that it is impracticable to separate the payments reliably, then an asset and a liability are recognised at an amount equal to the fair value of the underlying asset. The liability is reduced as payments are made and an imputed finance cost on the liability is recognised using the incremental borrowing rate.

ii) Assets held under leases

Leases of property, plant and equipment that transfer to the company substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership are classified as finance leases. The leased assets are measured initially at an amount equal to the lower of their fair value and the present value of the minimum lease payments. Subsequent to initial recognition, the assets are accounted for in accordance with the accounting policy applicable to similar owned assets. Assets held under leases that do not transfer to the company substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership (i.e. operating leases) are not recognised in the Company’s Balance Sheet.

iii) Lease payments

Payments made under operating leases are generally recognised in profit or loss on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease unless such payments are structured to increase in line with expected general inflation to compensate for the lessor’s expected inflationary cost increases. Lease incentives received are recognised as an integral part of the total lease expense over the term of the lease.

Minimum lease payments made under finance leases are apportioned between the finance charge and the reduction of the outstanding liability. The finance charge is allocated to each period during the lease term so as to produce a constant periodic rate of interest on the remaining balance of the liability.

m. Recognition of dividend income, interest income or expense

Interest income or expense is recognised using the effective interest method.

The ‘effective interest rate’ is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash payments or receipts through the expected life of the financial instrument to:

- the gross carrying amount of the financial asset; or

- the amortised cost of the financial liability.

In calculating interest income and expense, the effective interest rate is applied to the gross carrying amount of the asset (when the asset is not credit-impaired) or to the amortised cost of the liability. However, for financial assets that have become credit-impaired subsequent to initial recognition, interest income is calculated by applying the effective interest rate to the amortised cost of the financial asset. If the asset is no longer credit-impaired, then the calculation of interest income reverts to the gross basis.

n. Income tax

Income tax comprises current and deferred tax. It is recognised in profit or loss except to the extent that it relates to a business combination or to an item recognised directly in equity or in other comprehensive income.

Current tax

Current tax comprises the expected tax payable or receivable on the taxable income or loss for the year and any adjustment to the tax payable or receivable in respect of previous years. The amount of current tax reflects the best estimate of the tax amount expected to be paid or received after considering the uncertainty, if any, related to income taxes. It is measured using tax rates (and tax laws) enacted or substantively enacted by the reporting date.

Current tax assets and current tax liabilities are offset only if there is a legally enforceable right to set off the recognised amounts, and it is intended to realise the asset and settle the liability on a net basis or simultaneously.

Deferred tax

Deferred tax is recognised in respect of temporary differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and the corresponding amounts used for taxation purposes. Deferred tax is also recognised in respect of carried forward tax losses and tax credits. Deferred tax is not recognised for:

- temporary differences arising on the initial recognition of assets or liabilities in a transaction that is not a business combination and that affects neither accounting nor taxable profit or loss at the time of the transaction;

- temporary differences related to investments in subsidiaries, associates and joint arrangements to the extent that the company is able to control the timing of the reversal of the temporary differences and it is probable that they will not reverse in the foreseeable future; and

- taxable temporary differences arising on the initial recognition of goodwill.

Deferred tax assets are recognised to the extent that it is probable that future taxable profits will be available against which they can be used. The existence of unused tax losses is strong evidence that future taxable profit may not be available. Therefore, in case of a history of recent losses, the company recognises a deferred tax asset only to the extent that it has sufficient taxable temporary differences or there is convincing other evidence that sufficient taxable profit will be available against which such deferred tax asset can be realised. Deferred tax assets

- unrecognised or recognised, are reviewed at each reporting date and are recognised/ reduced to the extent that it is probable/ no longer probable respectively that the related tax benefit will be realised.

Deferred tax is measured at the tax rates that are expected to apply to the period when the asset is realised or the liability is settled, based on the laws that have been enacted or substantively enacted by the reporting date.

The measurement of deferred tax reflects the tax consequences that would follow from the manner in which the company expects, at the reporting date, to recover or settle the carrying amount of its assets and liabilities.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are offset if there is a legally enforceable right to offset current tax liabilities and assets, and they relate to income taxes levied by the same tax authority on the same taxable entity, or on different tax entities, but they intend to settle current tax liabilities and assets on a net basis or their tax assets and liabilities will be realised simultaneously.

o. Borrowing cost

Borrowing costs are interest and other costs incurred in connection with the borrowing of funds. Borrowing costs directly attributable to acquisition or construction of an asset which necessarily take a substantial period of time to get ready for their intended use are capitalised as part of the cost of that asset. Other borrowing costs are recognised as an expense in the period in which they are incurred.

p. Cash and cash equivalents

For the purpose of presentation in the statement of cash flows, cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand, deposits held at call with financial institutions, other short-term, highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value, and bank overdrafts. Bank overdrafts are shown within borrowings in current liabilities in the Balance Sheet.

q. Earnings per share

i. Basic earnings per share

Basic earnings per share is calculated by dividing:

- the profit / (loss) attributable to owners of the company

- by the weighted average number of equity shares outstanding during the financial year, adjusted for bonus elements in equity shares issued during the year.”

ii. Diluted earnings per share

Diluted earnings per share adjusts the figures used in the determination of basic earnings per share to take into account:

- the after income tax effect of interest and other financing costs associated with dilutive potential equity shares, and

- the weighted average number of additional equity shares that would have been outstanding assuming the conversion of all dilutive potential equity shares.

r. Contingent liabilities and contingent assets

Contingent liabilities are disclosed when there is a possible obligation arising from past events, the existence of which will be confirmed only by the occurrence or non occurrence of one or more uncertain future events not wholly within the control of the Company or a present obligation that arises from past events where it is either not probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle or a reliable estimate of the amount cannot be made Contingent assets are not recognised however are disclosed in the financial statements where an inflow of economic benefit is probable. Contingent assets are assessed continually and if it is virtually certain that an inflow of economic benefits will arise, the asset and related income are recognised in the period in which the change occurs.”

s. Recent accounting pronouncements

i. Ind AS 115 - Revenue from contracts with customers

Nature of change

Ind AS 115, Revenue from contracts with customers deals with revenue recognition and establishes principles for reporting useful information to users of financial statements about the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from an entity’s contracts with customers. Revenue is recognised when a customer obtains control of a promised good or service and thus has the ability to direct the use and obtain the benefits from the good or service in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods and services. The standard replaces Ind AS 18 Revenue and Ind AS 11 Construction contracts and related appendices.

A new five-step process must be applied before revenue can be recognised:

1. identify contracts with customers

2. identify the separate performance obligation

3. determine the transaction price of the contract

4. allocate the transaction price to each of the separate performance obligations, and

5. recognise the revenue as each performance obligation is satisfied.

Ind AS 115 also introduces new guidance on, amongst other areas, combining contracts, discounts, variable consideration, modifications and require that certain costs incurred in obtaining and fulfilling customer contracts be deferred on Balance Sheet and amortized over the period and entity expects to benefit from customer relationship.

The adoption of the new standard may impact the timing of revenue recognition for broadcasting revenue and revenue from digital media services. Further, what constitutes a performance obligation under the new standard maybe different than the current accounting revenue recognition principles.

The management is in the process of conducting a detailed accounting scoping analysis across the services within the Company’s revenue streams.

The new standard also requires detailed disclosures regarding nature, timing and uncertainty of revenue transactions which is presently being assessed by the management.

The new standard is mandatory for financial years commencing on or after 1 April 2018 and early application is not permitted. The standard permits to apply this standard using one of the following two methods:

(a) retrospectively to each prior reporting period presented or

(b) retrospectively with the cumulative effect of initially applying this standard recognised at the date of initial application.

Impact

The Company is in the process of assessing the detailed impact of Ind AS 115. Presently, the Company is not able to reasonably estimate the impact that application of Ind AS 115 is expected to have on its financial statements, except that adoption of Ind AS 115 is not expected to significantly change the timing of the Company’s revenue recognition for sale of services.

Date of adoption

The Company intends to adopt the standard using the modified retrospective approach which means that the cumulative impact of the adoption will be recognised in retained earnings as of 1 April 2018 and that comparatives will not be restated.

ii. Appendix B to Ind AS 21- Foreign currency transactions and advance consideration Nature of change

The Ministry of Corporate Affairs (MCA) has notified Appendix B to Ind AS 21, Foreign currency transactions and advance consideration. The appendix clarifies how to determine the date of transaction for the exchange rate to be used on initial recognition of a related asset, expense or income where an entity pays or receives consideration in advance for foreign currency-denominated contracts.

For a single payment or receipt, the date of the transaction should be the date on which the entity initially recognises the non-monetary asset or liability arising from the advance consideration (the prepayment or deferred income/contract liability). If there are multiple payments or receipts for one item, date of transaction should be determined as above for each payment or receipt.

The appendix can be applied:

- retrospectively for each period presented applying Ind AS 8;

- prospectively to items in scope of the appendix that are initially recognised

a. on or after the beginning of the reporting period in which the appendix is first applied (i.e. 1 April 2018 for entities with March year-end); or

b. from the beginning of a prior reporting period presented as comparative information (i.e. 1 April 2017 for entities with March year-end).

Impact

The Company is in the process of assessing the detailed impact of application of the above mentioned appendix to its foreign currency transactions.

Date of adoption

The Company intends to adopt the amendments prospectively to items in scope of the appendix that are initially recognised on or after the beginning of the reporting period in which the appendix is first applied (i.e. from 1 April 2018).

iii. Amendments to Ind AS 40 - Investment property - Transfers of investment property Nature of change

The amendments clarify that transfers to, or from, investment property can only be made if there has been a change in use that is supported by evidence. A change in use occurs when the property meets, or ceases to meet, the definition of investment property. A change in intention alone is not sufficient to support a transfer. The list of evidence for a change of use in the standard was re-characterised as a non-exhaustive list of examples and scope of these examples have been expanded to include assets under construction/ development and not only transfer of completed properties.

The amendment provides two transition options. Entities can choose to apply the amendment:

- Retrospectively without the use of hindsight; or

- Prospectively to changes in use that occur on or after the date of initial application (i.e. 1 April 2018 for entities with March year-end). At that date, an entity shall reassess the classification of properties held at that date and, if applicable, reclassify properties to reflect the conditions that exist as at that date.

Impact

The management does not foresee any material impact on account of this amendment.

Date of adoption

The Company has decided to apply the amendment prospectively to changes in use that occur after the date of initial application (i.e. 1 April 2018).

iv. Amendments to Ind AS 12- Income taxes regarding recognition of deferred tax assets on unrealised losses

Nature of change

The amendments clarify the accounting for deferred taxes where an asset is measured at fair value and that fair value is below the asset’s tax base. They also clarify certain other aspects of accounting for deferred tax assets set out below:

-A temporary difference exists whenever the carrying amount of an asset is less than its tax base at the end of the reporting period.

-The estimate of future taxable profit may include the recovery of some of an entity’s assets for more than its carrying amount if it is probable that the entity will achieve this. For example, when a fixed-rate debt instrument is measured at fair value, however, the entity expects to hold and collect the contractual cash flows and it is probable that the asset will be recovered for more than its carrying amount.

- Where the tax law restricts the source of taxable profits against which particular types of deferred tax assets can be recovered, the recoverability of the deferred tax assets can only be assessed in combination with other deferred tax assets of the same type.

- Tax deductions resulting from the reversal of deferred tax assets are excluded from the estimated future taxable profit that is used to evaluate the recoverability of those assets. This is to avoid double counting the deductible temporary differences in such assessment.

An entity shall apply the amendments to Ind AS 12 retrospectively in accordance with Ind AS 8. However, on initial application of the amendment, the change in the opening equity of the earliest comparative period may be recognised in opening retained earnings (or in another component of equity, as appropriate), without allocating the change between opening retained earnings and other components of equity.

Impact

The management does not foresee any material impact on account of this amendment. Date of adoption

The Company shall apply the amendments to Ind AS 12 retrospectively in accordance with Ind AS 8 with the corresponding impact recognised in opening retained earnings as at 1 April 2018, based on the relief provided by the standard.

B. Measurement of fair values

The fair value of investment property has been determined by external, independent property valuers (CSV Techno Services Private Limited), having appropriate recognised professional qualifications and recent experience in the location and category of the property being valued.

The methodology adopted for valuation is Sales Comparison Method under Market Approach, and the fair value is arrived at is based on similar comparable transactions or asking rates by the sellers of similar flats in the market. The rates are then adjusted for the various attributes affecting the valuation like floor, size, view etc. The methodology falls in the Level 2 input hierarchy as specified in Ind AS 113, where the comparables were adjusted for various attributes.

स्रोत: रेलीगरे टेचनोवा

न्यूज़ फ़्लैश

  • MARKET CUES : FIIs ने कैश में `566.52 Cr की खरीदारी की
  • MARKET CUES : DIIs ने कैश में `183.41 Cr की खरीदारी की
  • MARKET CUES : FIIs ने F&O में `800 Cr की बिकवाली की
  • MARKET CUES : इंडेक्स फ्यूचर्स में `818 Cr की बिकवाली की
  • MARKET CUES : इंडेक्स ऑप्शंस में `140.36 Cr की खरीदारी की
  • MARKET CUES : स्टॉक फ्यूचर्स में `42.76 Cr की बिकवाली की
  • MARKET CUES : स्टॉक ऑप्शंस में `79.20 Cr की बिकवाली की
  • MS ON TCS : Equal-weight रेटिंग, लक्ष्य `1,980/Sh
  • MS ON TITAN : Equal-weight रेटिंग, लक्ष्य `1240/Sh
  • MS ON ICICI BANK : Overweight रेटिंग, लक्ष्य `665/Sh

अभी देखें

OUR WINNING PICKS

DID YOU INVEST?

INTRADAY PICKS!

(August 06, 2018)

AT (Rs)



GAIN (Rs)

ALL TIME WINNERS

RECO PRICE

PEAK PRICE

OUR PACKAGES

Super Combo

Powerful mix of both trader and investor packs with timely expert advice.

Technical

Designed especially for traders looking to tap the profit opportunities of volatile markets.

Fundamental

For all investors looking to unearth stocks that are poised to move.